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My husband and I are getting excited and stoked for our upcoming honeymoon. We are going on a road trip through the Pacific Northwest. He’s bought a fly fishing rod, and I am envisioning long lazy summer days by a lake . . . where I will be . . . quilting! I started to look and think of a travel quilt project I could bring, which then led me to another quilting project to get ready for the quilting project!

IMG_6592English paper piecing is a great way to quilt while traveling. I came across this book and blog while browsing for paper piecing tutorials. The book is a great read and really inspiring. The author talks about her travel kit, using a pencil box to hold the supplies, and a smaller sewing pouch to hold the little pieces. Of course, I wanted to make my own!

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This picture is for April – she said to me the other day, your blog pictures all look so neat and tidy! That’s because I often consciously straighten my table before I take a shot. Here’s a candid behind the scenes shot of my sewing area, filled with scraps, thread, tools, and piles of other projects currently in the works.

IMG_1251-2I wanted a small pouch that would fit inside the pencil box, with a zipper closing it on three sides. I settled on a four inch square size. I’ve been thinking and dreaming a lot of the wild geese quilting pattern, so I chose that for the outside. I sketched the pattern on tracing paper, and paper pieced by machine the blocks, to get that nice crisp look and because the pieces were so small.

IMG_1256-2For the lining, I took inspiration from the blog again. On one side, a small pocket to hold thimble, paper clips, and scissors. On the other side, a strap to hold a spool of thread, and pincushion to hold pins and needles.

IMG_6571The next step – the zipper – was a pain. I’ve never done a zipper like that. Something about zippers always confuse me anyway. I found a free tutorial for a pouch similar to mine online, and that helped a lot. Probably if I tried the same pouch again, it would come together easier.

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I love the small size. Each piece is so tiny and simple.

IMG_6576This is one pouch that is ready to travel!

IMG_6580Now for the paper piecing. I learned a few nifty tricks from the book. For my project, I chose equilateral triangles. A simple repeating shape that is so lovely in its sameness.

IMG_6588I know I like paper piecing, because one winter I worked on this quilt each evening. But I wasn’t happy with how it turned out. I think I lost control of the color scheme, and the scrappy look just didn’t work out. With this new quilt, I decided I wanted to use my dyed fabric scraps. Browsing other equilateral triangle quilts, I found myself drawn to quilts that used multiple colors and were offset with white triangles.

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I cut triangles of my dyed fabric and triangles of white muslin fabric (leftover from my wedding table cloths!). I cut triangles of cardboard to act as my templates instead of purchasing plastic ones. And I sewed a quick test run to try it all out. I’ll be making multiple units like this, piecing triangles into hexagons, and then sewing those together to make up the quilt.

IMG_6593All the pieces fit neatly into the pencil case.

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Ready to throw in my back pack. Ready for vacation.

IMG_6599Have you ever taken a quilt on the go? What did you make?

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