Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Owens Valley’

Cathy and I met up this morning to work on our foreground. Things are a little simpler for me, as I am an edge piece, so I am mainly collaborating with Cathy on my piece.

IMG_7870We started by laying out what ideas and colors we had so far. My kitchen table was just wide and long enough for our two panels to lay out side by side. Cathy is going to have an iris field in the bottom of her panel. We talked about how it would look good if it extended into mine a bit.

IMG_7868I auditioned a few fabrics next to hers, to pick colors of similar values. Finally my ice dyed fabric has a place! The multi colored patterning on it matched with the effect well. I chose a green dominated color for the stem background, and a purple dominated color for the flowers.

IMG_7872I started cutting the fabrics into rough shapes to see how’d they look, and Cathy let me borrow one of her iris to get a feel. Aren’t her iris lovely?! I can’t wait to make a few of my own for the corner. I think I’ll make them slightly smaller, as my iris section is smaller. I turned on my iron, and we worked away cutting, fusing, and placing. Sometimes we’d chat, ask the other’s opinion, sometimes we’d work in silence, in our own little world. It felt companionable and pleasant. What a great new way to make a quilt!

IMG_7873Then we both started playing around with our background greens, auditioning different colors, talking about where the light to darker colors would look good, and how to not just have straight lines, but more natural looking lines. We looked at pictures of the valley, and it looks like different groupings of bushes and grasses make different colored sections across the valley. So I tried putting out a layered approach, of different greens, and then cut them to different shapes and sizes. I’m thinking my stitching on top can be where I put in detail of bushes and grass using different colored threads.

IMG_7879Here you can start to see my layers cut out and layed down. They are very plain, so I think that puts more emphasis on the stitching making the pattern and design. I am thinking I will practice some different designs that might work! Maybe sketch out a couple, think about how lines could make the impression of bushes.

IMG_7884Did you also notice the brown of my tree changed?! I kept looking at my first tree, and it just seemed too dark. I like the brown that Cathy chose for her tree branch, and decided I needed to lighten my tree color. I knew it was going to be one of those details, that if I left it in, it would continue to haunt me. So best to change it now. I didn’t have any brown colors on hand, but Cathy had a hand-dyed brown she generously gave me to use, so I cut out another tree! Don’t you think it looks better?

IMG_7878This time, I traced it onto the fusible webbing as one solid piece. The last tree I broke into smaller pieces, thinking I’d save on fabric, but I didn’t like how once laid down they weren’t one piece. This way today used up more fabric, but I think the tree being one piece looks better.

DSCN5151

Photo by Cathy

And our end layout for this session! Our tree branches are lined up, and our greens picked out and cut.

DSCN5152

Photo by Cathy

The last thing I did was take a piece of solvy (water soluble stabilizer), and very roughly trace the outline of our tree, both our branches together. My idea for the leaves is to cut fabric into a million little pieces, sandwich them between two pieces of solvy, and quilt the leaves roughly together. Then I will dissolve the solvy in water, and I’ll be left with a loose netting of leaves and string I can layer over our tree branches. I want to try this technique to mimic the way the background can be seen through the leaves. I don’t want to cut out solid chunks of fabric, I want the leaves to be varied in their thickness and have the background show through. We’ll see how it works! That will be next weekend’s project.

{This post is part of a series. To see other posts in this series, please click here}

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

A few years ago, a group formed from our quilt guild, of quilters who were interested in art quilting. We call ourselves Out of the Box, and we’ve done different projects together, learning new skills and playing with new techniques. Last year, we challenged ourselves to work in a series. This year, we decided to do a panel quilt together.

photo 1-2

In September, we met to discuss the idea, how it would work, and to share and show examples of other group quilts. We agreed we wanted to do a landscape quilt that was more realistic than abstract. We agreed we wanted to make individual panels, that when hung side by side, looked like one quilt. Each panel would reflect the individuality of the quilter. We chose a familiar landscape to anyone who has visited or lived in the Owens Valley: the mountain skyline of Mt. Tom, Basin, and Humphrey.

photo 2-2

We decided to make our panels long and skinny. The quilt would be 36″ x 70″, so each of us would make a 10″ x 36″ panel. We selected a photo to use as inspiration. Our next meeting was in October, when we came back together to sketch out the look.

photo-2Nela had sketched the mountain scene at the top of each panel, so that the horizon line stretched across the quilt. We also discussed our foreground, and what we’d liek to see there. We decided on a spring scene, with green fields and grass. We are going to put in a big cottonwood tree, a creek with iris flowers, deer and butterflies and a lizard, an old cabin, a mule, and wagon. It was fun to talk about what we think makes our home unique, and how we can portray it in our quilt.

For our November meeting, we came back together with our fabrics, to choose colors for the mountains.

IMG_7711Again, we hung our paper panels on Nela’s design board, and auditioned different fabrics.

IMG_7709When a particular mountain or portion crossed two panels, we worked together on deciding what colors to choose.

IMG_7707After selecting a fabric we’d like, like this beautiful blue sky cloud piece that Cathy hand dyed, we cut it into sections, so each person went home with a little piece.

IMG_7714We made notes on the paper panels, and attached names to the fabric to keep it all straight. Foothills, Mt. Tom, Basin, Humphrey . . .

IMG_7721My panel is on the far left, and I have Mt. Humphrey. Here’s the mountain in draft form! Next I’ll cut out the fabric into shapes, fuse, and lay onto a muslin fabric base.

IMG_7712Fabric was scattered all over the work tables as we pinned, cut, talked, visited, played, laughed, and enjoyed each other’s company. Part of what is so enjoyable about this new project is the time it takes as we work together to make the quilt. Instead of quilting being a solitary craft, we’ve now made it into a social collaborative experience.

At our next meeting in December, we’ll bring our mountain scapes together, to see how each interacts with the other. Maybe colors will need to be added, lines adjusted, or clouds added. Then it will be on to the foreground!

I do think I need to have a dye session, as I am low on greens. Maybe some ice dyeing to get multi patterned fabric. I’ll have to think about how to make it look like fields of sagebrush.

{This post is part of a series. To see other posts in this series, please click here}

Read Full Post »

As you might remember, I shared a past post on printing photographs on fabric. I was inspired by the fall colors and early snow on the mountains. This week I started to play around with the fabric, and getting caught in the moment, finished the quilt in two days!

The quilt measures 16″x18.5″, and features blooming rabbit brush, fresh snow on Mt. Tom, and Aaron’s new cross bike. Winston made it into the quilt too, can you spot him?

This is one of my favorite fabrics in the quilt. Classic Owens Valley view of Mt. Tom off in the distance. I had fun with adding stitching to the image, enhancing the fence and mountain snow.

Close-up of the snowy mountains. Didn't that turn out nice?

Detail of the fence. Notice how the thread mimics the wood grain, so sweet!

I played around with repeating the bike's shapes with stitching around the quilt.

I think this will be a quilt to hang at home, and imagine it will always remind us of our bike rides here in the Owens Valley.

Read Full Post »