Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Travel Quilt’ Category

Stitch by stitch my equilateral quilt grew, until one day it was suddenly … done!
image

After ironing the top flat, I prepared it for quilting by making the quilt sandwich. It was evening and I was tired and skipped a few steps thinking it would help speed things along.
image

Famous last words. Skipping steps never speeds things up, and I discovered a number of bumps on the fabric backing. *sigh*
image

I set the quilt aside and returned fresh at another time, carefully taping down my layers, keeping each flat and taut. Voila – the quilt was ready for quilting!
image

I decided I wanted to use cotton perle thread for a large stitch look. And of course I then felt like being a little playful and using lots of different colors instead of choosing just one.
image

I chose a radiating star pattern, using the natural diagonal line of the patchwork to make the quilting lines. I alternated colors randomly as each thread ran out.
image

For the binding, I selected a mixture of yellow and yellow-green fabric. I think the bright colors complement the quilt well, while also blending in with the green.
image
I gifted the lap sized quilt to my mother-in-law Joann for Christmas, thinking it would be lovely to snuggle under as a lap quilt or use as a room accent on a couch.
image
All fabric hand dyed by yours truly, the quilt top is hand pieced and hand quilted. You can read three other posts on this quilt here, here and here.

Read Full Post »

The quilt that travels continues to grow, though now from home, not from the road. With the time change, cooler weather, and darker evenings, I find myself enjoying picking up a little hand sewing each evening. The quilt and sewing kit sit by the couch, ready for a few minutes of sewing.

IMG_7654

The quilt has now grown to be 24 inches square!

IMG_7658

Amazing how just doing a little bit each day can grow so quickly.

IMG_7660

And suddenly I needed more supplies. So this morning I took some time to restock my sewing kit. I jotted down some notes because I couldn’t remember how big I originally chose to make my triangles, and wanted to figure out a quick way to cut more.

IMG_7646I needed more templates cut from cardboard. As the quilt grows, templates need to be left on the edges to connect more triangles to. So my pile of templates has been dwindling as more and more are left in the quilt. I raided our recycling, and cut more from thin cardboard.

IMG_7652I also needed more triangles, and discovered if I cut rows and then use the 60 degree triangle ruler, it goes quite quickly.

IMG_7647And after a little bit (I’ll admit, these things don’t just happen in a few minutes, it does take some time), I had a couple of piles of scrap colors.

IMG_7648A few other things I’ve discovered: regular thread I use on the machine can be challenging to hand sew with. I end up with these monstrous knots and have to cut the thread, knot, restring, restart . . . I’m thinking I might try using quilting thread for the hand sewing whip stitch parts, because that is where I seem to run into the most trouble. I’ll continue using just simple white machine thread for basting the triangles into squares, because that uses a large amount of thread. Now my sewing kit is stocked for another few weeks of stitching triangles!

IMG_7653I will admit, this will be my first, entirely hand pieced quilt. I love to sew by hand, and have quilted by hand, but have never pieced a quilt by hand!

IMG_7661Taken at a glance, it seems like a tremendous amount of work. But taken piece by piece, bit by bit, it isn’t hard at all. I feel like there is a parable for life in there somewhere.

IMG_7662

How big will it grow? Nobody knows!

Read Full Post »

We had a great adventure road trip through Oregon. Two weeks of rivers, mountain bikes, breweries, coffee shops, and camping.

PicMonkey CollageAnd through it all, I found time to pull out my travel sewing quilt and quilt. Just a moment here and there. In the evenings by camp light. In the lazy mornings with a second cup of tea.

IMG_1342What was great is how the small size of the project allowed for any amount of time. I could pull out my kit and sew for five minutes or an hour. However long the moment lasted.

IMG_1180Sometimes Winston even kept me company!

IMG_1340I think this will be my go-to-project for whenever I’m away from home, camping with friends, visiting family for the holidays, taking the plane on trips. If I’m traveling the kit will come along!

PicMonkey Collage2Just as our trip was coming to a close, I sewed the last triangle I had pre-cut and brought with me. Almost 200 triangles!

IMG_6737After arriving home, I’ve already restocked the kit with more triangles, and am wondering how big I want to make this quilt. Lap quilt size? Go for a twin quilt? It comes together so easily and effortlessly, if I just worked on it here and there . . . I think it would grow pretty quickly! How big do you think I should go?

Read Full Post »

My husband and I are getting excited and stoked for our upcoming honeymoon. We are going on a road trip through the Pacific Northwest. He’s bought a fly fishing rod, and I am envisioning long lazy summer days by a lake . . . where I will be . . . quilting! I started to look and think of a travel quilt project I could bring, which then led me to another quilting project to get ready for the quilting project!

IMG_6592English paper piecing is a great way to quilt while traveling. I came across this book and blog while browsing for paper piecing tutorials. The book is a great read and really inspiring. The author talks about her travel kit, using a pencil box to hold the supplies, and a smaller sewing pouch to hold the little pieces. Of course, I wanted to make my own!

IMG_1247-2

This picture is for April – she said to me the other day, your blog pictures all look so neat and tidy! That’s because I often consciously straighten my table before I take a shot. Here’s a candid behind the scenes shot of my sewing area, filled with scraps, thread, tools, and piles of other projects currently in the works.

IMG_1251-2I wanted a small pouch that would fit inside the pencil box, with a zipper closing it on three sides. I settled on a four inch square size. I’ve been thinking and dreaming a lot of the wild geese quilting pattern, so I chose that for the outside. I sketched the pattern on tracing paper, and paper pieced by machine the blocks, to get that nice crisp look and because the pieces were so small.

IMG_1256-2For the lining, I took inspiration from the blog again. On one side, a small pocket to hold thimble, paper clips, and scissors. On the other side, a strap to hold a spool of thread, and pincushion to hold pins and needles.

IMG_6571The next step – the zipper – was a pain. I’ve never done a zipper like that. Something about zippers always confuse me anyway. I found a free tutorial for a pouch similar to mine online, and that helped a lot. Probably if I tried the same pouch again, it would come together easier.

IMG_6573

I love the small size. Each piece is so tiny and simple.

IMG_6576This is one pouch that is ready to travel!

IMG_6580Now for the paper piecing. I learned a few nifty tricks from the book. For my project, I chose equilateral triangles. A simple repeating shape that is so lovely in its sameness.

IMG_6588I know I like paper piecing, because one winter I worked on this quilt each evening. But I wasn’t happy with how it turned out. I think I lost control of the color scheme, and the scrappy look just didn’t work out. With this new quilt, I decided I wanted to use my dyed fabric scraps. Browsing other equilateral triangle quilts, I found myself drawn to quilts that used multiple colors and were offset with white triangles.

IMG_6589

I cut triangles of my dyed fabric and triangles of white muslin fabric (leftover from my wedding table cloths!). I cut triangles of cardboard to act as my templates instead of purchasing plastic ones. And I sewed a quick test run to try it all out. I’ll be making multiple units like this, piecing triangles into hexagons, and then sewing those together to make up the quilt.

IMG_6593All the pieces fit neatly into the pencil case.

IMG_6594

Ready to throw in my back pack. Ready for vacation.

IMG_6599Have you ever taken a quilt on the go? What did you make?

Read Full Post »