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Archive for the ‘Landscape Quilt’ Category

Last weekend was a thrilling and delightful experience. I had the honor and pleasure of being invited to participate in an art show with four other artists at the Mountain Rambler Brewery.

IMG_3731Sunday morning we gathered at the brewery before it opened to hang the artwork. There were quilts, pastels, oils, and watercolor!

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After laying out all the artwork on the tables, Ann suggested where various pieces could go and we started to hang. There was a lot of putting up, stepping back, thinking about it, moving around, gazing, until finally, each one was just right.

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I have two pieces in the show, my Bristlecone Sunset and South Fork of Big Pine Creek mountains (which I’ll be doing its own blog post on soon!). My pieces are to the left of the door as you first come in. We grouped a few more bristlecone pine trees near mine, a quilt by Suzanne Logan and an oil painting by Ann Piersall.

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Ann’s stunning oil paintings take up most of one wall, showing the beauty of our mountain landscape.

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To the right of her paintings, are the other quilts by Suzanne Logan, including this stunning owl. One of my favorites of her work.

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On the opposite side of the room, are watercolors by Mary Newton, and pastel by Scott Weaver.

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We had a casual meet the artists reception Sunday evening. It was a pleasure to see friends and share the artwork with all. After so many hours of working tirelessly to meet the deadline, it was a heady feeling to have it all done!

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The show will be up through October, if you are interested to see the artwork in person. Thank you Ann for inviting us all to participate in your show, and Joe for sharing the brewery space with us!

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I finished the mountain quilt just in time to take it for a hike and photograph it in the landscape where it was inspired before hanging it in the show. My friend Sage commented on my picture of the quilt saying, “Reminds me of a Doug Robinson quote, ‘To be a mountaineer is to first love the mountains, then to climb them.’ And then to sew them.”

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Last weekend I had the great fortune to attend a two day workshop at Road to California with Gloria Loughman called Confident Colour. Before going I made time for one dye session, making a range of blues and oranges to bring to the class.

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The workshop started with a brief lecture on how to read the color wheel, and the basic types of color combinations. We colored in examples of the combinations, which would be our choices to work from for the rest of the workshop.

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Throughout the two days, we were tasked with making the same quilt pattern over and over, trying out different color combinations. The first quilt we were asked to do a monochromatic scheme, the hardest to do! I chose blue-green as my color.

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Halfway through the first day, Gloria gave a short demonstration on how to paint a sky fabric. I was entranced. I loved it and couldn’t wait to try.

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After dipping a piece of plain white fabric in water, I spread it out on a plastic surface. Mixing colors, starting from light to dark, I slowly painted the sky. It’s almost like watercolor the way the colors blend and combine.

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I really think the sky makes the quilt too! On the left is my monochromatic quilt as I first made it in the morning, with a plain blue piece for the sky. And on the right is after I learned to paint skies I went back and made a new one. The sky can turn the whole mood of the quilt, here making it stormy and dark.

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The second coolest thing about the workshop was learning to use the color wheel! We all have seen a color wheel, and basically understand how it works. What was really neat and what I had never done before was choose a color combination and select fabrics to match by holding them up next to the wheel. I really got a feel for which fabrics fell where on the wheel, and how a particular color wouldn’t fit within the selected scheme.

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This was my second quilt, with a complementary color scheme, from blue-green to red-orange. I love the sky so much! I would however, not put the orange hill in the foreground, I think I could have gone with all blue hills.

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My third quilt is my favorite. I chose a triad color scheme, using green, violet and orange. The sky was so fun to paint, and the mountains fairly shimmer with color. I really enjoyed Gloria’s teaching style. She left plenty of time for working and asking questions, but also filled the workshop with endless techniques and tips. On the second day she introduced making linear lines in the landscape by cutting up individual segments and laying them over another color.

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For my fourth quilt, I chose a split complementary, picking a range of greens from yellow-green to blue-green and a red-violet for accent.

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Gloria left us with lots of tips and ideas for how to quilt our finished pieces.

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Here are my friend Margaret’s quilts, I really love her gray cloud sky that she painted with some orange. Just makes it pop!

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And here’s a few others from the class. Amazing how even when working within set limits there is so much individual creativity!

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And here are my four completed colorscapes! What should I do with them? Combine them into one quilt? Make each a small wall hanging?

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A few years ago, a group formed from our quilt guild, of quilters who were interested in art quilting. We call ourselves Out of the Box, and we’ve done different projects together, learning new skills and playing with new techniques. Last year, we challenged ourselves to work in a series. This year, we decided to do a panel quilt together.

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In September, we met to discuss the idea, how it would work, and to share and show examples of other group quilts. We agreed we wanted to do a landscape quilt that was more realistic than abstract. We agreed we wanted to make individual panels, that when hung side by side, looked like one quilt. Each panel would reflect the individuality of the quilter. We chose a familiar landscape to anyone who has visited or lived in the Owens Valley: the mountain skyline of Mt. Tom, Basin, and Humphrey.

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We decided to make our panels long and skinny. The quilt would be 36″ x 70″, so each of us would make a 10″ x 36″ panel. We selected a photo to use as inspiration. Our next meeting was in October, when we came back together to sketch out the look.

photo-2Nela had sketched the mountain scene at the top of each panel, so that the horizon line stretched across the quilt. We also discussed our foreground, and what we’d liek to see there. We decided on a spring scene, with green fields and grass. We are going to put in a big cottonwood tree, a creek with iris flowers, deer and butterflies and a lizard, an old cabin, a mule, and wagon. It was fun to talk about what we think makes our home unique, and how we can portray it in our quilt.

For our November meeting, we came back together with our fabrics, to choose colors for the mountains.

IMG_7711Again, we hung our paper panels on Nela’s design board, and auditioned different fabrics.

IMG_7709When a particular mountain or portion crossed two panels, we worked together on deciding what colors to choose.

IMG_7707After selecting a fabric we’d like, like this beautiful blue sky cloud piece that Cathy hand dyed, we cut it into sections, so each person went home with a little piece.

IMG_7714We made notes on the paper panels, and attached names to the fabric to keep it all straight. Foothills, Mt. Tom, Basin, Humphrey . . .

IMG_7721My panel is on the far left, and I have Mt. Humphrey. Here’s the mountain in draft form! Next I’ll cut out the fabric into shapes, fuse, and lay onto a muslin fabric base.

IMG_7712Fabric was scattered all over the work tables as we pinned, cut, talked, visited, played, laughed, and enjoyed each other’s company. Part of what is so enjoyable about this new project is the time it takes as we work together to make the quilt. Instead of quilting being a solitary craft, we’ve now made it into a social collaborative experience.

At our next meeting in December, we’ll bring our mountain scapes together, to see how each interacts with the other. Maybe colors will need to be added, lines adjusted, or clouds added. Then it will be on to the foreground!

I do think I need to have a dye session, as I am low on greens. Maybe some ice dyeing to get multi patterned fabric. I’ll have to think about how to make it look like fields of sagebrush.

{This post is part of a series. To see other posts in this series, please click here}

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This weekend we went for a lovely fall ride. The colors of the valley were stunning: clear blue skies, white topped mountains, and yellow blooming rabbitbrush. I had fun taking lots of pictures.

I started imagining a sort of fabric collage quilt, with different views and scenes from our ride mixed together. When we got back, I treated some fabric with chemical, in order to print photos on fabric with my inkjet printer.

You let the fabric sit in Bubble Jet Set 2000 for five minutes, then hang and air dry. Then I ironed to 8 1/2 x 11 freezer paper, trimmed to fit, and printed like normal paper!

The fabric really absorbs the dye, so you have to edit the pictures in photoshop, increasing their saturation, almost to the point where they look fake. The colors fad though and look normal once printed. Next, I need to heat set (iron) the fabric, and rinse before sewing. I love how clear and crisp the images look on paper. I can’t wait to start stitching!

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With a bit of free time this afternoon, I found myself in my sewing room with sun streaming in the window and Winston laying at my feet. I loved every second, the birds singing, the sewing machine humming, clipping threads, and seeing the quilt come to life. I’m hooked! Almost half way done and I’ll be so excited when I see it finished.

Machine Quilting the Lodore landscape quilt

Free motion quilting an abstract Canyon of Lodore river view.

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