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Archive for June, 2017

Time passes, months roll by, and the Master Class continues, with assignments due on a regular basis. Our sketch is due the 10th of the month, the blocked out quilt is due the 20th, and the final is due the end of the month. I work hard to meet as many of the deadlines as I can, sometimes I do better than others. The deadlines are a great motivator for me to set aside time and make the space to create.

color scheme

April’s assignment was focused on color – my favorite! With as much as I love color and think I know a lot about it, I still learned a lot in this month’s lesson, and it rocked my world. Don’t be literal with color. The assignment was to pick out a color scheme, and make a sketch, and then put the two together. I knew I wanted to try to do a bristlecone pine tree quilt. What kind of color scheme could I do that wasn’t green and brown? I looked online for inspiration, and saw some great tree paintings, using brilliant oranges and reds for the trees. From one of the paintings, I came up with the analogous color scheme above, mostly orange, with green as the compliment, and the dark red as the accent color.

APR SLJ sketch 3 value sketch

For my sketch, I drew inspiration from a photo I had taken of a bristlecone on one of our many visits to see the ancient trees. In the first round of critique, my teacher commented on not needing the sliver of tree to the left (again, this theme with making art – you don’t need to be literal! Do what makes a good design. But I digress).  She encouraged me to add shadows to the trees, and to mimic the lines in the tree in the background landscape. And lastly, she commented on the leaf area looking clumpy. I agree with that! Making leaves on trees is always a challenge for me. This gave me something to ponder … how to make the leaves less clumpy?!

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For the next step, I modified my sketch, incorporating the suggested changes. I enlarged my 5″x8″ sketch to 10″x16″, and was ready to select my colors!

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I pulled out all my warms reds to oranges and laid them out. I took a photo and converted to grayscale to get a sense of value. I continued to select and sort, and take a photo and look and sort and rearrange until I had a smaller selection. For each fabric I matched it to an area on my value sketch.

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Okay – this part took forever – and I would be curious to hear how you do this part if you have a better or different way! I took tracing paper, and traced each value/color piece on my sketch, basically making puzzle pieces. I cut out each tracing paper puzzle piece, then using that as a template, cut out each fabric puzzle piece, and then laid out on the background fabric in the position it was going to go.

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Here is my blocked out piece for the second assignment due date of the month. I was so pleased with how it came out! After lots and lots of cutting and arranging, seeing it all together, the color scheme and design seemed to just make the quilt sing.

I always eagerly await the teacher’s comments, and was totally blown away when this is what she posted:

I love it!  the colors are wonderful…and you conveyed the slight anthropomorphic feel very well. everything is nicely balanced with the shadows and the “tail” (!).

I really like the mystery of it….and also the richness of those gradated colors.  It wouldn’t have half the impact if you’d used a mix of many different colors….the yellows to oranges in particular are so rich especially placed against those cool greens – nicely done!   You totally got the point of this exercise.

Wow! No further work needed, just carry on, except, the tree seemed to be listed to the right. I adjusted it a bit, rotating it to the left, and started to glue. Usually with raw edge applique, I use fusible webbing, but one of the women in our quilt group had said she likes to use basting glue, as it isn’t as stiff as the fusible webbing and gives a more natural look to the quilt. I was encouraged to try and was excited to try it on this quilt.

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This part also took forever, carefully gluing down each little piece, lifting and gluing and placing back in the right place and adjusting and checking and making sure I got glue in all the areas it needed to go. The quilting came together quickly, and the little but mighty bristlecone pine tree quilt was done.

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I am so pleased with how it turned out! And can see how it would be fun to work in a series when the correct subject is chosen. I could do many many more bristlecone pine tree quilts!

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