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Archive for February, 2016

Last Sunday our Out of the Box group gathered again to play with fabric. This time Margaret was showing us how to use soy wax to make batik patterns. She brought a pot full of hot soy wax and we played!

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We tried using different found objects like lids and cookie cutters as stamps. We tried painting with paint brushes to make our own designs. I brought some previously ice dyed fabric to paint. We all had a hand at seeing how the wax felt and worked.

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When I got home, I bleached my two pieces of fabric to lighten the background color. Then I ice dyed the fabric again to give a little more color. Kind of seems redundant now that I type it! My thought was to give the background a different color than what it had before.

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One benefit of using soy wax is that it is easy to rinse out. Instead of the endless boiling required when using beeswax for batik, soy wax can just be rinsed in the sink! After rinsing and drying and ironing, I compared how the fabrics looked to when we started.

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They are definitely lighter than the original, with the batik patterns standing out! But I don’t think my second ice dye really gave much added color. I still like how they turned out!

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I have two new fun fabrics to add to my stash, and a great new technique to add to my skill set. I look forward to experimenting with it more and collecting items to stamp with! How do you like to make patterns with soy wax?

 

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Acorns – Seeds of Hope

In September, my childhood home burned in the Butte Fire. After four years of drought, California was dry and burned like tinder. The property was once a verdant forest, and in a moment became a blackened and bare world.

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After the grief and sadness at losing what once was, I started to feel hope. Visiting the property after the burn, walking the familiar trails and roads, I felt comforted by the resiliency of mother nature. The land will come back. It might be different, it might take a while, but it will. Already there are ferns and tree sprouts bringing green to the property, and we planted acorns and wildflower seeds.

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It was this thought of new beginnings that I started making wool acorns. My mom was visiting and we had a companionable day rolling wool roving into cute little acorn balls!

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I had collected some acorn tops last year for just such an occasion. We rolled balls and matched them to tops. So adorably cute!

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It was addicting, rolling each wool acorn. As soon as one was finished another was quickly started.

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Soon I started to get an idea about making them into ornaments. With Christmas approaching I thought they’d make great Christmas gifts! I drilled a hole in each top and strung it with string, and then glued the top to the acorn.

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After stringing the acorn, I felt if needed something more to stand as an ornament. What about a leaf to go with it? Beautiful black oaks grew all over our property, and I love the shape of their leaves.

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I found a sketch of a black oak leaf, shrunk it to a smaller size, and cut out shapes from wool felt.

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On each leaf I stitched lines for veins, and the ornaments were done!

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I loved each one, with its unique characteristics and style. I made so many, imagining that each was a gift of hope of what the future could hold for each person I gifted one to.

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And I remembered to keep a few for myself! Two acorns found their way onto my annual wreath, this year made from cuttings from our Christmas tree and sage brush collected here in the valley.

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Is it just me or do the acorns make everything look just that much cuter?

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Here’s to acorns that carry the hope of regrowth and a greener future!

 

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